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I love the Proximity Search. Essentially, enter in coordinates, an address, a landmark, or whatever Google knows how to decode, and let the search engine run through the database looking for repeaters that are close to that location.

To filter the results down, you select the distance from the search location. If you only want to look on a particular band, you can do that, too. You should never enter a band and a frequency; it's one or the other.

There is a healthy list of features you can filter by as well as by confirmation that the repeater is operational.

I use this search all the time to locate repeaters near me. When using my HT at a hotel in another city, I will look for repeaters that are within 20 miles of me with wide area coverage. It's a fast way to locate repeaters when you don't know what the nearby cities or mountain tops are called...or maybe even the county you are in. You can search for repeaters around you like you have local knowledge!

This search has been used by disaster relief organizations to locate repeaters to serve remote operational areas during disaster relief situations. You could even use it to locate a repeater at a remote camp site or trail somewhere. This search really takes the research out of your search of a paper directory to help you find usable repeaters.

The search results will tell you how far away the repeater is to the location you entered.

An added bonus for smart phone users, there is a "Near Me' search which will use your onboard GPS to autofill your location! I use this a lot at the hotels and even on the road between major cities to find repeaters.

This search ignores all political lines, including international. It will search for close repeaters regardless of city, county, state, provincial, or international boundaries.

Happy searching!